University of Maryland grabbed the overall first place this year with their 'watershed' design. A total of 19 teams participated this year including teams from China, Canada, Belgium and New Zealand.

Description of the winning entry (from DOE website)

The forms of the house highlight the path of a water drop. WaterShed's split butterfly roofline highlights storm water runoff from each module, directing and collecting it into the water axis at the core of the house. Water used within the house intersects this axis through a consolidated mechanical core. 

WaterShed's holistic approach to water conservation, recycling, and storm water management includes:

  • A modular constructed wetland that helps filter and recycle greywater from the shower, clothes washer, and dishwasher

  • A green roof that slows rainwater runoff to the landscape while improving the house's energy efficiency

  • A garden, an edible wall system, and a composting station to illustrate the potential for improved health, energy, and cost savings with a complete carbon cycle program.



Some photographs of the solar houses

Exterior architectural photograph of Maryland's entry in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011, Washington D.C., Sept. 30, 2011. (Credit: Jim Tetro/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)


Exterior architectural photograph of Canada's entry in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011, Washington D.C., Sept. 30, 2011. (Credit: Jim Tetro/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)


Exterior architectural photograph of SCI-Arc/Caltech's entry in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011, Washington D.C., Sept. 30, 2011. (Credit: Jim Tetro/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

Exterior architectural photograph of Team China's entry in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011, Washington D.C., Sept. 23, 2011. (Credit: Jim Tetro/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)


Exterior architectural photograph of New Zealand's entry in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011, Washington D.C., Sept. 30, 2011. (Credit: Jim Tetro/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

 

Participants have to design and build a house that:

  • Is affordable, attractive, and easy to live in
  • Maintains comfortable and healthy indoor environmental conditions
  • Supplies energy to household appliances for cooking, cleaning, and entertainment
  • Provides adequate hot water
  • Produces as much or more energy than it consumes.

 

The Contest

Teams compete in 10 contests ranging from architecture, affordability, engineering and home entertainment. Here is a list of all 10 contests and respective winners.

Architecture - Won by Maryland. Houses are judged on Architectural elements, Holistic design, Lighting, Inspiration & Documentation.

Market Appeal- won by Middlebury College. Judged on Livability, Marketability and Builability 

Engineering- New Zealand. Judged on Functionality, Efficiency, Innovation, Reliability & Documentation. 

Communications- Middlebury College. Teams are scored "for delivering clear and consistent messages; images that represent the vision, process, and results of each project; and creativity in engaging audiences.

Affordability- Tied between  Parsons NS Stevens & Team Belgium. Construction cost of each house is determined by an estimator and teams earn 100 points for achieving a target construction cost of $250,000 or less. Winning houses were estimated at US $229,890.26. Overall winner Maryland's house was estimated at US $336,335.89.

 Comfort Zone- Ohio State. Houses are scored for maintaining narrow temperature (71°F (22.2°C) and 76°F (24.4°C)) and relative humidity below 60% 

Hot Water- tied among New Zealand, Tennessee, Parsons NS Stevens, Appalachian State, Maryland, SCI-Arc/Caltech & Ohio State with a perfect score of 100. The goal is to deliver 15 gallons (56.8 l) of hot water (110°F/43.3°C) in 10 minutes or less.

 Appliances- Illinois. Entries are judged based on running the appliances (Refrigerator, freezer, washing machine, dryer, dishwasher) at specified performance levels to mimic average US household.

Home Entertainment- Middlebury College. Entries are judged based on "How well does it accommodate the pleasures of living, such as sharing meals with friends and family, watching movies in a home theater, and surfing the Web? How well does it accommodate a small home office for a telecommuter?" This contest includes hosting 2 dinner parties and a movie night for neighbors.

Energy Balance- Tied among New Zealand, Purdue, Tennessee, Florida Int'l, Maryland, Illinois & SCI-Arc/Caltech. This contest awards full points for producing at least as much energy as its house needs.

Some more Videos

Views: 663

Comment

You need to be a member of Archisage to add comments!

Join Archisage

© 2019   Created by Archisage.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service